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Lecture, Prof. Dr. Jørgen DELMAN, 12 October 10:00 am

Climate politics and governance innovations in China – the case of Hangzhou

The lecture asks what climate change does to the Chinese party-state system through examining the emerging climate governance architecture at the local level. Climate change presents one of the most challenging policy agendas that China has been confronted with and it forces the party-state system to re-examine how it deals with policy formulation and implementation. The lecture takes fragmented authoritarianism and governance theory as its lens and looks at how climate change is being dealt with at the local level in Hangzhou, Capital City of China’s prosperous Zhejiang Province. It will be argued that well-tested implementation mechanisms are being applied but that the local party-state is also being challenged by the need to work with businesses and civil society in new ways and that this may lead to governance innovations.

 

Jørgen Delman, PhD, is Professor of China Studies at University of Copenhagen. His research examines state-society relations and political change in contemporary China. He has worked on and with China since 1972 as a researcher and international development consultant. Currently, he focuses on China’s climate change politics, climate governance at city level, energy and energy security politics, in particular renewable energy. He is a co-organizer of University of Copenhagen’s ThinkChina.dk initiative (www.thinkchina.dk) which aims at bringing researchers and external stakeholders together to think about how Denmark can benefit from its relationship with China.

 

Datum:                      Montag, den 12.10.2015

Zeit:                10:00 – 11:30Uhr

Ort:                Hörsaal OAW, Institut für Ostasienwissenschaften/Sinologie, Campus Altes AKH, Spitalgasse 2, Hof 2, Eingang 2.3., 1090 Wien

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Institut für Ostasienwissenschaften
Universität Wien
Spitalgasse 2 - Hof 2
1090 Wien
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